Avascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapy

There may be medications given to alleviate pain, or medications stopped if they are thought to be the cause (., corticosteroids). Reduced weightbearing is typically essential for healing and can be achieved by limiting activities or by using crutches or other mobility aids. Range-of-motion exercises are typically included as part of the treatment plan. Electrical stimulation is sometimes used to promote bone growth. Eventually, though, most people with osteonecrosis will require surgery to slow or stop progression of the condition.

Avascular necrosis of the femoral head is associated with many conditions which all converge on a single common pathway: collapse of the femoral head and subsequent degenerative joint disease. These conditions include trauma, corticosteroid use, excessive alcohol consumption, systemic lupus erythematosus, sickle cell disease, renal failure or transplant, HIV, coagulopathies, connective tissue diseases, and Gaucher disease. Through mechanical interruption of blood flow, thrombosis/embolism, increased vascular pressure, or venous obstruction, essential blood flow to the femoral head is compromised leading to necrosis and inevitable collapse. Read More

Avascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapy

avascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapy

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avascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapyavascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapyavascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapyavascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapyavascular necrosis of the femoral and humeral heads after high-dosage corticosteroid therapy