Prednicare steroids for cats

A lot will depend on how stable the vet thinks the cat is on or off meds, and when they last saw her. Legally they have to see the pet every so often to continue to prescribe for her as part of their duty of care - same as a doctor will need to see you every so often for ongoing medications.

Most vets will not post tablets, but there is nothing to stop them posting a written prescription if they do not need to see the cat at a particular time, though you will probably be charged the postage of course! Can you get to your vet in the evening perhaps when maybe someone else is available to mind the baby for you, or at the weekend? If so maybe they will at least supply you with a few tablets to keep you going until you can get her in. We are usually pretty accommodating of that sort of situation provided an appointment is made where a check up is needed.

The correct dosage of prednisone and prednisolone depends on the condition being treated and how the patient responds to the medication. A rule of thumb for dosing prednisone and prednisolone is to use as much as is required but as little as possible to achieve the desired effect. Pets should also be weaned off of prednisone as soon as their condition allows. When dogs and cats have to be on prednisone for an extended period of time, giving the medication every other day or even less frequently if possible can reduce the chances of serious side effects. Common dosages for prednisone and prednisolone in dogs in cats are

An excessive level of corticosteroids may cause Cushing's disease. When a pet is on long-term, high doses of glucocorticoids, there is an increased risk that it will develop a condition called iatrogenic (medication induced) Cushing's disease . The clinical signs of Cushing's disease include increased thirst and urination, an increase in UTI's and skin and ear infections, a "pot-bellied" appearance, thinning skin and hair loss. In the treatment of some diseases, the risk of iatrogenic Cushing's disease is unavoidable. To minimize this risk, corticosteroid doses are tapered down over time, or several different drugs may be used in combination.

Steroids themselves, during treatment, may cause Cushingoid symptoms involving significant alteration of fat, carbohydrate, protein and mineral metabolism, . redistribution of body fat, muscle weakness and wastage and osteoporosis may result. During therapy, effective doses suppress the Hypothalamo-Pituitreal-Adrenal axis. Following cessation of treatment, signs of adrenal insufficiency extending to adrenocorticol atrophy can arise and this may render the animal unable to deal adequately with stressful situations. Consideration should therefore be given to means of minimising problems of adrenal insufficiency following the withdrawal of treatment, . dosing to coincide with the time of the endogenous cortisol peak (. in the morning with regard to dogs and the evening with regard to cats) and a gradual reduction of dosage (for further discussion see standard texts). Systemically administered corticosteroids may cause polyuria, polydipsia and polyphagia, particularly during the early stages of therapy. Some corticosteroids may cause sodium and water retention and hypokalaemia in longer term use. Systemic corticosteroids have caused deposition of calcium in the skin (calcinosis cutis). Corticosteroids may delay wound healing and the immunosuppressant actions may weaken resistance to or exacerbate existing infections. In the presence of bacterial infection, anti-bacterial drug cover is usually required when steroids are used. In the presence of viral infections, steroids may worsen or hasten the progress of the disease.

Prednicare steroids for cats

prednicare steroids for cats

Steroids themselves, during treatment, may cause Cushingoid symptoms involving significant alteration of fat, carbohydrate, protein and mineral metabolism, . redistribution of body fat, muscle weakness and wastage and osteoporosis may result. During therapy, effective doses suppress the Hypothalamo-Pituitreal-Adrenal axis. Following cessation of treatment, signs of adrenal insufficiency extending to adrenocorticol atrophy can arise and this may render the animal unable to deal adequately with stressful situations. Consideration should therefore be given to means of minimising problems of adrenal insufficiency following the withdrawal of treatment, . dosing to coincide with the time of the endogenous cortisol peak (. in the morning with regard to dogs and the evening with regard to cats) and a gradual reduction of dosage (for further discussion see standard texts). Systemically administered corticosteroids may cause polyuria, polydipsia and polyphagia, particularly during the early stages of therapy. Some corticosteroids may cause sodium and water retention and hypokalaemia in longer term use. Systemic corticosteroids have caused deposition of calcium in the skin (calcinosis cutis). Corticosteroids may delay wound healing and the immunosuppressant actions may weaken resistance to or exacerbate existing infections. In the presence of bacterial infection, anti-bacterial drug cover is usually required when steroids are used. In the presence of viral infections, steroids may worsen or hasten the progress of the disease.

Media:

prednicare steroids for cats